By
Ryan Ledendecker
|
September 23, 2023
|
11:01 pm

Supreme Court extends pause on case involving government's collusion with Big Tech

The conservative-majority U.S. Supreme Court made a shocking decision that temporarily helps the Biden administration on a high-profile free speech case. 

According to the Washington Examiner, an order issued earlier this year that limits the government as far as communicating with social media companies regarding the suppression of content has been frozen by the high court, giving it more time to consider the matter.

The original ruling by Louisiana-based U.S. District Judge Terry Doughty, issued in July, "limited the federal government’s communications with social media companies about virtually all content."

The Examiner noted the origin of the case:

Last year, Republican attorneys general in Missouri and Louisiana filed the suit, along with four individual plaintiffs who allege their social media posts about topics such as the COVID-19 lab leak theory and vaccine side effects were removed or suppressed.

The primary social media companies involved include Meta’s Facebook, Alphabet’s YouTube and X, formerly known as Twitter.

That ruling was upheld by a 5th Circuit Court of Appeals three-judge panel earlier this month, with the exception that it limited the social media companies to which the original ruling applied.

Biden's Department of Justice appealed the latest ruling last week, which ultimately led to the high court pausing the situation so that it could be examined more closely.

The Examiner noted:

Department of Justice Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar argued that “unprecedented limits on the ability of the President’s closest aides to use the bully pulpit to address matters of public concern, on the FBI’s ability to address threats to the Nation’s security, and on the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's] ability to relay public-health information at platforms’ request.”

Justice Samuel Alito, who handles 5th Circuit Court emergency appeals, was responsible for the temporary hold.

Alito's latest extension gives the court until Sept. 27 to be considered.

Many believe that if the government isn't checked on this critically important matter, there could be massive implications for how it determines "misinformation" regarding the upcoming 2024 election.

Only time will tell how the high court navigates this one, but hopefully it does the right thing and ultimately protects free speech.

Written By:
Ryan Ledendecker

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