By
Robert Ayers
|
October 31, 2022
|
10:00 pm

Details of 911 call Paul Pelosi made during his attack released

New details have been released about the 911 call that Paul Pelosi, the husband of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), made during the attack he suffered, the Daily Mail reports

Early on Friday morning, a man broke into Pelosi's $6 million home in San Francisco, California. A violent confrontation ensued, but not before Pelosi could call 911.

The Daily Mail is now reporting some of the details of that 911 call.

The outlet reports that Pelosi talked to the 911 operator "in code, so as not to anger his assailant further." The outlet also says that Pelosi did this "as he tried to keep the operator on the line for as long as possible" in order to buy time until the police could arrive.

But, according to the Daily Mail, the 911 operator also played a key role here. After Pelosi could be heard asking such questions as "What's going on? Why are you here? What are you doing to me?" the 911 operator is said, "to have sensed something was wrong."

It's at this point that the 911 operator called for an emergency police response. In the process of doing so, the operator related to the police some of the details learned from Pelosi.

"He states there is a male in the home and that he is going to wait for his wife," the operator says. "He stated that he doesn't know who the male is but that his name is David and that he is a friend. He sounded somewhat confused."

We know that police ended up arriving at Pelosi's residence to find the suspect, in underwear, fighting with Pelosi over a hammer. The struggle ended with the suspect, who has since been identified as 42-year-old Davi DePape, striking Pelosi with the hammer, causing injuries that required surgery.

It appears that Pelosi's 911 call may have saved his life.

Both Pelosi and the 911 operator have received praise from local law enforcement.

San Francisco District Attorney Brooke Jenkins put out a statement saying that it was a combination of "Mr. Pelosi having the ability to make that call" and "the instincts of that dispatcher to realize something was wrong" that allowed police to quickly respond to the situation.

San Francisco Police Chief William Scott called the two actions "life-saving."

Written By:
Robert Ayers

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